The Price of Panic – Joe Glenn

By Joe Glenn, AFC Media team

Those of us who have questioned lockdown measures are very familiar with pushback:

“I understand that these are difficult times, but do you want to kill grandma!?!”

“Yes I know suicides and drug overdose deaths are rising, but those aren’t highly infectious and contagious diseases.”

“We’ll get through this. We are all in this together.”

These statements are often said with the best of intentions. But as the famous proverb says, “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

Let’s look into some of the prices that our society is paying due to current government mandates in place worldwide.

Hunger and Poverty

According to the World Bank and Unicef, before the pandemic began, one in 6 kids worldwide lived in poverty. According to the UN:

“These numbers alone should shock anyone. And the scale and depth of what we know about the financial hardships brought on by the pandemic are only set to make matters far worse. Governments urgently need a children’s recovery plan to prevent countless more children and their families from reaching levels of poverty unseen for many, many years.”

Death from Other Diseases

In a recent report from The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)it was revealed that young adults aged 25-44 years saw the largest increase in “excess” deaths from previous years, a stunning 26.5% jump. Excess deaths are a comparison of deaths this year versus the 5 year average for deaths from the previous 5 years (2015-2019). In fact this jump of 26.5% is drastically more than jumps in older age groups which are the target age groups for coronavirus deaths. In a video interview the former chairman of the FDA, Scott Gottlieb, said, “I would suspect that a good portion of the deaths in that younger cohort were deaths due to despair, due to other reasons. We’ve seen a spike in overdoses, and I would suspect that a good portion of those excess deaths in that younger cohort were from drug overdoses and other deaths that were triggered by some of the implications of what we’ve gone through to try to deal with COVID-19.”

In addition to these “deaths of despair” we also must examine the costs of missed cancer screenings as well as interruptions to the supply chain in delivering key treatments for diseases like TB, Malaria and HIV. This could be awful in third world countries in particular, all to fight Covid 19, a disease which worldwide has an average death age of around 80 years old. We are sacrificing many younger members of our society with our current policies.

Harm to Children

In Australia recently, 4 newborn babies died at one hospital in Australia. The reason they died was that these babies, in Adelaide, could not be transported to Melbourne for critical medical care they could only get in Melbourne, due to Covid travel rules. Australia has implemented some very strict border restrictions to stop the Covid and this is one of the prices they have paid.

In a previous blog, we outlined school closures and how they aren’t stopping the spread of Covid. Let’s look at some of the potential psychological concerns of keeping kids out of school. Sitting at home all day with no sports or in-person school can’t be good for kids. Playing video games and eating junk food just simply isn’t a healthy lifestyle. Even worse, in one report from Texas, they continue to see plummeting test scores and plummeting attendance with more than 3 million of the states 5.5 million students trying to learn from home. This is very bad news both for these kids and for our society as a whole. Our education system has already been trending downwards over the last two decades. Now we’re making it worse.

Human Rights

In Hawaii during a one week span over 10,000 citations were issued. One elderly couple from Hawaii Kai (in their mid 70’s) were issued $5000 citations for eating lunch in their car by the boat ramp. A public Health expert from UH and her husband were cited while walking through a public park. This is sheer madness. No one’s life was put at risk while these things were done. These are small but significant steps towards larger oppression in a trend we all see nationally and worldwide.

According to Forbes, the pandemic response has wiped out almost half of our country’s black owned small businesses. Bear in mind that this was back in April and it’s likely that the toll is even worse by now.

Of course, we also have countless videos coming out of Australia, one example being a pregnant woman being arrested for encouraging people to attend lockdowns. Even in Idaho, we have seen a video of people being arrested for singing at church.

Our basic liberties are being stripped away during the pandemic (freedom of speech, freedom to assemble, etc) and it’s quite scary to think how far this totalitarianism may go.

Conclusion

It’s up to each and every one of us to evaluate the price of the current panic. If we determine that the cure is worse than the disease we must be compelled to action. We must talk to friends, neighbors, council members, and elected leaders to set forward on a new path. While many in the political class don’t feel any of the impacts, it is the working class that feels the brunt of all of these things.

As a society, we must collectively say, “Something’s Not Right”.

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